The Do No Harm Act

The Do No Harm Act will help protect everyone’s religious freedom while ensuring that no one can misuse it to harm others.

Religious freedom is a shield that protects us all, not a sword to harm other people. But now, many are misusing a federal law that was designed to protect religious freedom–the Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA)–to claim a right to deny access to health care, jobs, and government-funded services, and to discriminate against LGBTQ people, women, religious minorities, and  nonreligious people.

The Do No Harm Act is simple: It’s designed to restore RFRA to its original intent. It preserves RFRA’s power to protect religious freedom, while also clarifying that it may not be used to harm others.

Our country is strongest when we are all free to practice the religion of our choice or no religion at all—without hurting others.

What you need to know

Restoring RFRA

The Do No Harm Act would bar RFRA from being used to undermine discrimination laws, deny access to healthcare, evade child labor laws, thwart laws to protect workers’ rights, and refuse to provide services under a government grant or contract.

 

Diverse supporters

More than 100 civil rights, LGBTQ, health, women’s, labor and faith organizations have endorsed the Do No Harm Act.

Faith groups for religious freedom

More than 30 religious organizations representing people from diverse faith traditions–including Muslims, Methodists, Baptists, Presbyterians, Wiccans, Orthodox Jews, Reform Jews, and Hindus–support the passage of the bill.

AU Testifies on the Do No Harm Act

"We are a stronger nation when we protect religious freedom for all, not just for some; when we are all free to believe or not, as we see fit, and to practice our faith—without hurting others; and when the government doesn’t elevate the religious beliefs of some over the rights of others."

What's being done?

April 2023

Reps. Bobby Scott (D-Va.), Steve Cohen (D-Tenn.), Jamie Raskin (D-Md.) and Mary Gay Scanlon (D-Pa.), and Senator Cory Booker (D-N.J.) introduce the Do No Harm Act in the 118th Congress.

Learn More

September 2021

After Kamala Harris became Vice President, Senator Cory Booker (D-N.J.) became the main sponsor of the Do No Harm Act in the Senate.

February 2021

The Do No Harm Act was introduced again in the House of Representatives by U.S. Rep. Bobby Scott (D-Va.), who was joined by several new lead sponsors: Reps. Steve Cohen (D-Tenn.), Jamie Raskin (D-Md.) and Mary Gay Scanlon (D-Pa.).

June 2019

AU President and CEO Rachel Laser testified before the House Education and Labor Committee on the misuse of RFRA, urging members of Congress to support the Do No Harm Act. She was joined by Rep. Joe Kennedy (D-Mass.) and the Rev. Jimmie Hawkins from the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.).

Watch the hearing on the misuse of RFRA

May 2016

For the first time, the Do No Harm Act was introduced in the House of Representatives by U.S. Reps. Joe Kennedy (D-Mass.) and Bobby Scott (D-Va.).The bill was reintroduced again in the House in 2017 and 2019; and in the Senate by then-Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Cal.) in 2018 and 2019.

Act now: Tell your members of Congress to support the Do No Harm Act

ACT NOW

Can't make it to D.C for SRF?

Join us at the Summit for Religious Freedom virtually!

If you can’t make it to the nation’s capital for the Summit for Religious Freedom, you can still participate in an impressive virtual program of live, curated sessions from the comfort of your home, local coffee shop or anywhere with an internet connection.

Find out more and register today!