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Demonizing For Dollars: Religious Right Ready To Attack Supreme Court Nominee

Supreme Court Justice David H. Souter's decision to retire and return to his farm in New Hampshire has really got the Religious Right's knickers in knots – but also has given movement leaders an opportunity.

President Barack Obama is expected to name Souter's replacement soon, and chances are the Religious Right isn't going to like that person's record.

What to do?

Answer: Go negative.

The Real World: Why Supreme Court Appointments Are So Important

It's possible "Tonight Show" Host Jay Leno already has conclusive results on this, but for today's purposes, I'm just going to make a wild assumption.

I'm going to assume that if I stopped the average American on the street and asked him or her to name all the U.S. Supreme Court justices, most would probably have no clue.

In fact, I doubt it would be much of a gamble to claim that many would not even know there are nine justices.

Misplaced Priorities: Justice Thomas Does The Dishes, But Forgets The Bill Of Rights

We don't hear much from Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas. He hasn't asked a question during oral arguments at the high court in more than two years.

So when the George H.W. Bush appointee does agree to speak at a public event, we look forward to hearing his thoughts -- especially when he is asked to speak on the Bill of Rights. That's something we'd like to hope he knows quite a bit about as a Supreme Court justice.

But recently, when Thomas took the podium to address high school essay-contest winners, he seemed to forget he was there to talk about the Constitution.

Red Mass Goes Mild: Catholic Hierarchy Lowers Lobbying Level For High Court Justices

[caption id="attachment_1027" align="alignright" width="300" caption="Archbishop Wuerl and Cardinal Foley after the Red Mass at St. Matthew's Cathedral, Washington, D.C., October 5, 2008. Photo taken from Flickr Creative Commons by II Primo Uomo"][/caption]

Today is the first Monday in October—the day when the U.S. Supreme Court is back in session for a new term.

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