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Texas Textbook Troubles: Lone Star State Grapples With Tome Review Process – Again

The news out of Texas is depressingly familiar.

The Lone Star State is in the process of reviewing public school social studies textbooks. Texas, as you might have noticed, is a large state. It has no shortage of first-class public and private universities. These institutions are full of scholars who have expertise in areas like history, civics, economics and so on.

Raytown, MO

AU received a complaint that a Social Studies teacher at Raytown Middle School told a student that the events of the Bible were historical truth and that the school’s social studies textbook, World History, Journey Across Time: The Early Ages, contained inappropriate religious material. We wrote to the school district to inform them that it is unconstitutional for public-school teachers to present the Bible to public-school students as religious truth.

Victory In Louisiana!: State Ed. Board Approves Sound Biology Textbooks

It appears that the state of Louisiana has come finally come to its senses when it comes to science education.

The State Board of Elementary and Secondary Education (BESE) voted 8-2 yesterday to approve high school biology textbooks that teach sound science, despite complaints by creationists who felt the books gave too much credibility to the theory of evolution.

More Trouble In Texas: State School Board (Sigh) Considers Ridiculous Resolution

I really never thought the Texas State Board of Education (SBOE) could become any more of a laughing stock than it already is. But I guess I was wrong.

Next week, the SBOE will consider a resolution that criticizes publishers for supposedly promoting anti-Christian/pro-Islamic bias in world history textbooks.

Troubling Textbooks: Why Vouchers Would Force You To Subsidize Hate

An Islamic school in Virginia has made some changes to its textbooks in an effort to tamp down criticism, the Associated Press has reported.

The Islamic Saudi Academy in Alexandria has been under fire for years because some of the books used at the private school promote extremely strict interpretations of Islam and are highly critical of other faiths.