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Marriage Madness

A group of Texas lawmakers gathered in late February to celebrate what they considered to be an important milestone in their state’s history: 10 years since the passage of a constitutional amendment that banned same-sex marriage.

Texas Rep. Asks Muslims To Take Loyalty Oath

American Muslims visiting the office of Texas state Rep. Mol­ly White (R-Belton) were asked to confirm their loyalty to the United States by staffers, according to The Texas Tribune.

White, who was not present in her office for Texas Muslim Capitol Day, an annual citizen lobbying event, left an Israeli flag on her desk along with instructions for Muslim visitors to publicly renounce terrorism and announce their respect for American law.

House Speaker Joe Straus (R-San Antonio) condemned White’s actions in a statement.

Tyranny In Texas: State Bill Would Punish Employees Who Recognize Same-Sex Marriage

As federal courts tell more and more states that they must allow same-sex marriage, it seems one of the few remaining holdouts is bracing for the inevitable. Texas, which hates to be messed with and loves to hate “non-traditional” marriage, has come up with a bill that would punish state clerks who issue marriage licenses to gay couples.

AU Chapter Leader Offers Secular Invocation Before El Paso Council

An Americans United chapter leader recently gave the first-ever secular invocation before a meeting of the El Paso, Texas, City Council.

David Marcus, president of AU’s El Paso Chapter, offered a message of inclusion before the board’s Dec. 2 meeting.

“We come together today in a spirit of cooperation and compromise,” he said, noting that the border city of more than 670,000 people is made up of residents with different beliefs and that each individual’s feelings are deeply important.

Boot These Bigoted Bans: Movement Seeks To Remove Anti-Atheist Bias From State Constitutions

Eight states still have provisions in their constitutions that either bar atheists outright from holding public office or require people to believe certain things about God and religion before they can be elected.

These provisions can’t be enforced. They were declared invalid by the U.S. Supreme Court in a 1961 ruling in the case of Torcaso v. Watkins. Yet they linger on, a testament to the bigotry of bygone days.

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