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Americans Really, Really Don’t Like Partisan Politicking From The Pulpit

There has been more debate than ever this campaign season about whether or not houses of worship should be permitted to endorse or oppose candidates for office. This is mostly thanks to Republican presidential nominee Donald J. Trump, who has repeatedly said that if he is elected he will end legal restrictions that keep churches from acting like political action committees.

Trumpeting Church Politicking

When it comes to the matter of houses of worship endorsing political candidates, Republican presidential nominee Donald J. Trump said he is out to make Religious Right dreams come true. 

The federal tax code currently prohibits all 501(c)(3) non-profits, including religious institutions, from using their resources to intervene in elections by endorsing or opposing candidates for public office. But during his acceptance speech at the Republican National Convention in July, Trump promised to do away with that longstanding prohibition if he wins the presidency.

Pulpit Politicking: Trump Proposal Is A Huge Mistake

Donald Trump wants to repeal the federal law that bars tax-exempt groups, including houses of worship, from intervening in partisan politics by endorsing or opposing political candidates. Trump, the Republican nominee for president, has some unusual ideas; this is among his worst.

Faith First: Survey Finds Most Clergy Don’t Endorse Candidates From The Pulpit – But Some Still Ignore The Law

With politics and religion intermingling quite a bit this campaign season, the Pew Research Center for Religion & Public Life decided to investigate how often pastors discuss politics and social issues from their pulpits. The results were pretty encouraging for those who believe churches should respect the law and stay away from activities designed to endorse or oppose candidates – but they also show there’s still a lot of work to be done.  

Bad Idea: Trump Repeats Call To Let Churches Endorse Candidates

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump reiterated his desire to change a federal law that prohibits houses of worship from endorsing candidates during his speech last night at the Republican National Convention (RNC).  

Trump said:

“At this moment, I would like to thank the evangelical community who have been so good to me and so supportive. You have so much to contribute to our politics, yet our laws prevent you from speaking your minds from your own pulpits.

GOP Call To Repeal Ban On Church Politicking Is ‘Reckless And Corrosive To Religious Life,’ Says Americans United’s Lynn

Changing Federal Law Could Dramatically Escalate Partisan Activity In Houses Of Worship, Church-State Watchdog Says

The Republican Party platform approved yesterday includes a call for altering federal law to allow houses of worship to jump into partisan politics. This change threatens religious life in America, says Americans United for Separation of Church and State.

The platform advocates repeal of the Johnson Amendment, a provision adopted by Congress in 1954 that prohibits 501(c)(3) tax-exempt, non-profit organizations, including houses of worship, from intervening in partisan politics by endorsing or opposing candidates for public office.

Inappropriate Appropriations: U.S. House Approves Spending Bill Limiting Reproductive Rights While Boosting School Vouchers And Pulpit Politicking

The U.S. House of Representatives passed an important appropriations bill (H.R. 5485) yesterday that will help fund the federal government for the next year. Tucked into this legislation are three troubling provisions that would weaken church-state separation and harm true religious liberty.

Some members of Congress are working to limit true religious freedom.

Doing Damage: Committee Says IRS Failure To Update Church Audit Procedures Is Harming The Agency

A private-sector committee that advises the Internal Revenue Service branch that oversees tax-exempt organizations says the IRS is “compromising its relevancy” by failing to revise the procedures that govern audits of churches.

In a lengthy report covering many areas of tax exemption, the Advisory Committee on Tax Exempt and Government Entities (ACT) said last week that the IRS’s leadership has dropped the ball when it comes to policing houses of worship that violate federal law.

The Persistence Of Pulpit Politicking

During a sermon in May 2008, the Rev. Gus Booth made absolutely sure his congregation knew precisely which presidential candidates he did not want them to back.

“If you are a Christian, you cannot support Hillary Clinton or Barack Obama.…Both Hillary and Barack favor the shedding of innocent blood (abortion) and the legalization of the abomination of homosexual marriage,” Booth, senior pastor of Warroad Community Church in Minnesota, said at the time.

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