Subscribe to RSS - kentucky

A Flood Of Nonsense: Ken Ham’s False Dichotomy

Ken Ham’s $102 million Ark Encounter theme park in Williamstown, Ky., opens today. The official launch of this boat on dry land has led to a spate of media attention for the Australian creationist and would-be Noah.

Ham’s “ark park” was the subject of a lengthy New York Times story recently, during which Ham admitted, yet again, that the entire project has one goal: converting people to his brand of fundamentalist Christianity.

Keeping Secrets?: Kim Davis Accused Of Violating Ky. Open-Records Law

Kim Davis’ legal woes aren’t quite over yet. The office of the State Attorney General announced yesterday that the embattled Rowan County clerk may have violated the Kentucky Open Records Act when she refused to comply with a records request from a Washington, D.C.-based government watchdog.

Supreme Court Declines Ky. Religious Home’s Appeal

The U.S. Supreme Court has declined to hear a long-running lawsuit over the public funding of a sectarian children’s home in Kentucky.

In May, the high court sent Pedreira v. Sunrise Children’s Services back to the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals; the appeals court subsequently sent it back to a federal trial court for further proceedings.

Theocratic Ky. Lawmaker Loses Re-Election Bid

A Kentucky legislator who has continually sought to undermine the separation of church and state lost his primary in May.

State Rep. Tom Riner (D-Jefferson County) was defeated by political newcomer Attica Scott, who faces no Republican opponent in November.

Riner, a Baptist pastor, frequently mingled religion and politics during his 34 years in the state legislature. In 2006, he added language to a state security bill that read, “The safety and security of the Commonwealth cannot be achieved apart from reliance upon Almighty God.”

Ky. Provides More Public Benefits To Ark Encounter

The Kentucky Tourism Development Finance Authority approved $18 million in tax incentives for Answers In Genesis’ Ark Encounter theme park in April.

Former Gov. Steve Beshear (D) had opposed granting incentives to the park, but Answers in Genesis filed a lawsuit claiming the state’s refusal violated its religious-freedom rights. In January, a federal court agreed, and Be­shear’s successor, Matt Bevin (R), announced he would not appeal the ruling.  According to the Louisville Courier-Journal, Bevin also packed the tourism board with new appointees after taking office.

Bluegrass Bonanza: Ky. Theocrat Loses Grip On Statehouse Seat

Political news of late has been dominated by three people – Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders. They’ve certainly provided good copy, but there are some other things going on politically that you might not have heard about.

Let’s consider Kentucky, for example. The commonwealth has been the site of mostly bad news lately. Ken Ham’s “Ark Park” is getting taxpayer incentives, and the state’s Republican governor, Matt Bevin, is thrilled.

Museum Misadventure: Ky. Elementary School Takes Students To Ken Ham’s Creationist Exhibition

A Kentucky elementary school has a strange concept of what constitutes a reward given that it took a group of students to Ken Ham’s Creation Museum in 2012 as a prize for having “perfect” attendance.

“Perfect” belongs in quotes, here, because Lee County Elementary in Petersburg, Ky., has a rather flexible definition of perfection: students could miss one day of school and still qualify for flawless attendance. (Who knew perfection was open to interpretation?)

The ‘Ark Park’ Fiasco: Authentic Faith And The Perils Of Government ‘Help’

Thanks to a misguided federal court ruling, Kentucky taxpayers will soon be footing the bill for a package of tax incentives designed to prop up an evangelistic theme park based on the biblical story of Noah’s Ark.

Americans United has followed the saga of the so-called “Ark Park” for years. The attraction sprang from the mind of Ken Ham, a creationist who decided it would be a good idea to build a large replica of Noah’s Ark in Grant County, Ky.

Ky. Gov. Approves Marriage License Compromise

Kentucky marriage licenses will no longer require signatures from county clerks thanks to an executive order from the state’s new governor. Matt Bevin (R), who took office in December, said his order was intended to “ensure that the sincerely held religious beliefs of all Kentuckians are honored.”

Pages