Subscribe to RSS - Gavin Grimm v. Gloucester County School Board

Essay Excellence

Like many young activists, Am­ericans United’s second annual essay contest winner Lekha Sunder’s activism is intersectional. She is passionate about the environment, voting rights, LGBTQ rights and, of course, church-state separation and religious freedom.

“The reason I’m uniquely passionate about the separation of church and state is because I’m atheist, and I have always felt slightly uncomfortable when religion is involved in matters relating to the public,” Sunder, a junior at Lamar High School in Houston, told Church & State.

Grimm Grievances

Editor’s Note: Americans United recently concluded its annual essay contest for high school students. Nearly 500 entries were received. The winner this year is Lekha Sunder, who will be a senior this fall at Lamar High School in Houston. Sunder received a scholarship prize of $1,500.

Ethan Cantrell, a recent graduate of Wheeling Park High School in Wheeling, W. Va., won second place. He plans to major in anthropology at West Vir­ginia University this fall. He was awarded $1000.

Federal Appeals Court Should Rule Religion Can’t Be Used As Excuse To Discriminate Against Gavin Grimm And Other Transgender Students

Gavin Grimm didn’t ask to be the face of the fight for transgender civil rights in America. But that’s just what he became when he asked his Virginia high school to recognize his humanity.

In A Suburban Chicago School Board Race, Transgender Rights Won

A suburban Chicago school board race this spring was seen as a referendum on transgender rights. According to Tuesday’s unofficial election results, transgender rights won.

Over a year ago, the school board for Township High School District 211 in the Palatine-Schaumburg area northwest of Chicago approved a settlement with the U.S. Department of Education to allow transgender students to use the restrooms and locker rooms consistent with their gender identity.

U.S. Supreme Court Sends Landmark Transgender Rights Case Back To Lower Court

The U.S. Supreme Court on March 6 decided to take a pass on hearing its first transgender-rights case in light of a shift in policy by the Trump administration.

In a brief order, the high court sent the case, Gloucester County School Board v. G.G., back to a lower court for more proceedings.

New Poll Shows Majority Of Americans Oppose Discrimination In The Name Of Religion

The confirmation hearing for federal Judge Neil Gorsuch, President Donald J. Trump’s nominee for the U.S. Supreme Court, got under way yesterday, with some senators mentioning religious freedom during their opening remarks.

Gorsuch will start taking questions today, and the issue is likely to resurface again. It will be interesting to hear what Gorsuch has to say. In AU’s view, some of his opinions on religious freedom are troubling, and that’s why we’re opposed to his nomination.

Thanks To Trump, A Major Transgender Rights Case Has Been Derailed At The Supreme Court

The Supreme Court this morning announced that it is remanding and vacating the lower-court decision in Gloucester County School Board v. G.G., the first transgender-rights case that the high court had ever agreed to hear.

So what does this mean, in laypeople’s terms? The Supreme Court had scheduled oral arguments for March 28. Now those arguments won’t happen this month. Instead, the case is going back to a lower federal court, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit, for more deliberation.

Americans United And National LGBT Bar Association Ask Supreme Court To Afford Transgender Student Equal Restroom Access

Organizations Work With Law Firm Hogan Lovells To File Court Brief Asserting Religious Beliefs Can’t Be Used To Justify Government Discrimination Against High School Student Gavin Grimm

Americans United for Separation of Church and State and the National LGBT Bar Association today asked the Supreme Court to affirm that a transgender student can use the school restroom that corresponds with his gender identity.