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Mass Mess: Bishops Use Church Service To Lobby Supreme Court

The justices of the U.S. Supreme Court tied a record last week but that’s not something they should be proud of.

On Sept. 30, six members of the high court attended the annual “Red Mass,” a special church service for the legal profession held by the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Washington, D.C.

In attendance at the Cathedral of St. Matthew the Apostle were Chief Justice John G. Roberts and Justices Stephen Breyer, Antonin Scalia, Clarence Thomas, Anthony M. Kennedy and Elena Kagan. Roberts, Scalia, Kennedy and Thomas are Catholic; Breyer and Kagan are Jewish. Read more

Supremely Scary: Justice Thomas’ Approach To Church-State Relations Is Truly Frightening

It’s Halloween, so be prepared to see some scary things today. I’m expecting a full complement of neighborhood ghosts and goblins at the house tonight for trick or treat, but they can’t faze me. I’ve already had my scare for the day. It came in the form of a 19-page rant by Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas.

The high court, you see, has been trying to decide what to do with a case out of Utah dealing with crosses that were displayed along highways as memorials to members of the highway patrol who died in the line of duty. Read more

Red Mass Mandate: Archbishop Advises High Court Justices About Religion And Government

Yesterday morning, I attended the Red Mass here in Washington along with five Supreme Court justices and Vice President Joe Biden. Okay, we weren’t in the same pew – they were in the front rows; I wasn’t.

But all of us heard Archbishop J. Augustine Di Noia, an American who now works at the Vatican, give a homily that instructed those in attendance on how they should feel about same-sex marriage, abortion and the dire threat of “humanism.” Read more

The Real World: Why Supreme Court Appointments Are So Important

It's possible "Tonight Show" Host Jay Leno already has conclusive results on this, but for today's purposes, I'm just going to make a wild assumption.

I'm going to assume that if I stopped the average American on the street and asked him or her to name all the U.S. Supreme Court justices, most would probably have no clue.

In fact, I doubt it would be much of a gamble to claim that many would not even know there are nine justices. Read more