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Roy Moore Has Always Believed He’s Above The Law

Back in the late 1990s when Roy Moore was a local judge in Etowah County, Ala., he was sued by the American Civil Liberties Union for opening courtroom sessions with prayer and displaying a hand-carved Ten Commandments monument in his courtroom.

Moore had garnered national attention with his vow to defy any ruling against him, and his defenders thought the time was right to bring him to Washington, D.C., for a press conference.

Church Officials Are Intervening In A Colo. County School Board Race

Tomorrow is election day in some parts of the country. Most political analysts are keeping a close eye on Virginia’s gubernatorial race, seeing it as a mini-referendum on the presidency of Donald Trump.

But there are other interesting races as well. One of them is taking place in Douglas County, Colo., where a school board election has attracted national interest.

Okla. Town Police End Religious Facebook Postings

An Oklahoma police chief will stop publishing religi­ous posts on his police department’s Facebook page after advocates deemed the posts unconstitutional.

Mounds Police Department Chief Antonio Porter had been posting Bible-themed messages, including verses and lessons on the department’s page.

The ACLU of Oklahoma sent a letter informing Porter and Mounds Mayor Rosa Jackson that religious posts were an endorsement of religion from the department, hence violating the First Amendment.

Zoned Out

When Muslims in Bernards Township, N.J., sought to build a mosque, they found themselves subjected to a strange requirement that wasn’t imposed on other houses of worship: They’d have to build a “supersized” parking lot.

Officials in the township insisted that since Muslims gather for prayers on Friday afternoon, everyone who might come to the mosque should have a dedicated parking spot.

Thank You, Barry Lynn, For 25 Remarkable Years Of Service To Americans United!

In September of 1992, a man named Barry W. Lynn was named executive director of Americans United.

At the time, I’d been working at AU for five years, and I knew Barry by name and reputation. If you worked in the fields of civil liberties or social justice, you’d know Barry; that’s just the way it was. He was an important player in those areas.

Thanks To Trump, A Major Transgender Rights Case Has Been Derailed At The Supreme Court

The Supreme Court this morning announced that it is remanding and vacating the lower-court decision in Gloucester County School Board v. G.G., the first transgender-rights case that the high court had ever agreed to hear.

So what does this mean, in laypeople’s terms? The Supreme Court had scheduled oral arguments for March 28. Now those arguments won’t happen this month. Instead, the case is going back to a lower federal court, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit, for more deliberation.

Americans United And National LGBT Bar Association Ask Supreme Court To Afford Transgender Student Equal Restroom Access

Organizations Work With Law Firm Hogan Lovells To File Court Brief Asserting Religious Beliefs Can’t Be Used To Justify Government Discrimination Against High School Student Gavin Grimm

Americans United for Separation of Church and State and the National LGBT Bar Association today asked the Supreme Court to affirm that a transgender student can use the school restroom that corresponds with his gender identity.

What’s The State Of Religious Freedom? Trump’s Muslim Ban Is An Immediate Threat

Tomorrow, a subcommittee of the House Judiciary Committee is holding a hearing on "The State of Religious Liberty in America." Today, Americans United joined two dozen organizations in a letter urging the subcommittee to focus on an extraordinary, immediate threat to religious freedom: President Donald J. Trump’s Muslim ban.

Maine Pagan Wins Right To Wear Horns In ID Photo

A Maine pagan priest won the right to wear goat horns in a state-issued identification card on Dec. 14, months after the Bureau of Motor Vehicles told him to remove them for an ID photo.

After telling the Bureau that he had contacted the American Civil Liberties Union, Phelan Moonsong, 56, received his horns-inclusive ID in the mail within days. The Bureau had previously told him to appeal its decision to Maine’s secretary of state.

Moonsong argued that the horns, which he has been wearing since 2009, are a part of his religious attire.

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