Duncan v. Nevada

In June 2015, the Nevada governor signed into law S.B. 302, which created the Education Savings Account Program. Through the program, parents may receive money from the state's public-school fund, which is deposited into an Education Savings Account, to pay for their child's education at a religious private school. Once the private school receives this funding, there are no prohibitions on how the public funds may be used, meaning that private schools are free to use these funds for religious instruction.  Read more

School of the Ozarks v. U.S. Department of Health & Human Services

As part of the Affordable Care Act's implementing regulations, group health plans are required to include coverage for various forms of preventative care, including all FDA-approved methods of contraception. Houses of worship are exempt from these requirements, and the Department of Health and Human Services later created a broader accommodation for certain nonprofit organizations. Read more

Wheaton College v. Burwell

As part of the Affordable Care Act's implementing regulations, group health plans are required to include coverage for various forms of preventative care, including all FDA-approved methods of contraception. Houses of worship are exempt from these requirements, and the Department of Health and Human Services later created a broader accommodation for certain nonprofit organizations.

Eternal Word Television Network v. Burwell

As part of the Affordable Care Act's implementing regulations, group health plans are required to include coverage for various forms of preventative care, including all FDA-approved methods of contraception. Houses of worship are exempt from these requirements, and the Department of Health and Human Services later created a broader accommodation for certain nonprofit organizations.

Roman Catholic Diocese of Atlanta v. Burwell

As part of the Affordable Care Act's implementing regulations, group health plans are required to include coverage for various forms of preventative care, including all FDA-approved methods of contraception. Houses of worship are exempt from these requirements, and the Department of Health and Human Services later created a broader accommodation for certain nonprofit organizations.

East Texas Baptist University v. Burwell

As part of the Affordable Care Act's implementing regulations, group health plans are required to include coverage for various forms of preventative care, including all FDA-approved methods of contraception. Houses of worship are exempt from these requirements, and the Department of Health and Human Services later created a broader accommodation for certain nonprofit organizations.

Archdiocese of St. Louis v. Burwell

As part of the Affordable Care Act's implementing regulations, group health plans are required to include coverage for various forms of preventative care, including all FDA-approved methods of contraception. Houses of worship are exempt from these requirements, and the Department of Health and Human Services later created a broader accommodation for certain nonprofit organizations.

Dordt College v. Burwell

As part of the Affordable Care Act's implementing regulations, group health plans are required to include coverage for various forms of preventative care, including all FDA-approved methods of contraception. Houses of worship are exempt from these requirements, and the Department of Health and Human Services later created a broader accommodation for certain nonprofit organizations. Read more

Latta v. Otter

In 2006, Idaho amended its state constitution to specify that “[a] marriage between a man and a woman is the only domestic legal union that shall be valid or recognized in this state.” In hearings before the state legislature, proponents of the ban urged its placement on the ballot because “marriage is God given” and “[n]ormalcy is a man and a woman; God made us that way.” The campaign urging the ban’s adoption was similarly religious in nature.
 
In 2013, four same-sex couples challenged Idaho’s marriage ban in federal court.

Conde-Vidal v. Rius-Armendariz

In 1999, Puerto Rico enacted a statute defining marriage as limited to a man and woman, and forbidding recognition of same-sex marriages performed elsewhere. The law was enacted after its sponsors received a petition from religious groups and a prominent evangelist. Much of the support for the law came couched in religious rhetoric. Some supporters of the bill went so far as to quote the Bible for the proposition that gay people are “worthy of death.”
 
In 2014, several same-sex couples challenged Puerto Rico’s marriage ban.

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