Church-state Separation And The Aftermath Of Sept. 11

Applying The Constitution In The Wake Of The Terrorist Attacks: An Americans United Position Paper

Voter guides prepared by TV preacher Pat Robertson's Christian Coalition for the Nov. 6 Virginia elections are skewed toward Republican candidates and are therefore inappropriate for church distribution, according to Americans United for Separation of Church and State. Read more

Jerry Falwell Tries To Cash In On Controversy

TV Preacher's Ministry Sends Out Fund-Raising Appeal Exploiting His Controversial Tirade Over Terrorist Attacks

The horrific terrorist attacks on the United States on Sept. 11 have led to an increase in what many scholars call "civil religion"-- endorsements (usually fairly generic) of God and faith by political leaders and government officials. It is important to remember that our civil liberties are at great risk in times of crisis, and that we should therefore be more, rather than less, vigilant about protecting them from erosion in the coming weeks and months.

During these challenging times, Americans United would like to stress the following points: Read more

AU Comments On Congressional Resolution Supporting 'god Bless America' In Public Schools

AU's Lynn Questions Lawmakers' Priorities, Says Bill Diverts Attention From Pressing Security Concerns

Americans United has warned a Cleveland mayoral candidate that his plan to distribute campaign literature in churches violates the law and could jeopardize the tax-exempt status of the houses of worship.

The Cleveland Plain Dealer reported Oct. 17 that the campaign of Democratic mayoral hopeful Raymond Pierce hopes to use churches to distribute Pierce campaign literature. Arnold Pinkney, director of the Pierce campaign, told a gathering of pastors he wants the literature in church bulletins or handed out by ushers. Read more

National Groups Urge President To Postpone Action On 'charitable Choice' Aid To Churches

44 Labor, Religious, Health And Civil Rights Groups Say 'Faith-Based' Job Bias Is 'Religiously Divisive,' Would Undercut National Unity

Religious groups should be able to spread their faith without having to apply for permission from the government, says Americans United for Separation of Church and State.

The Supreme Court announced today that it will hear a case from Stratton, Ohio, challenging a village ordinance that requires anyone wishing to engage in door-to-door solicitation or religious proselytizing to register with the city government and fill out a form giving detailed information about their activities.

Americans United Executive Director Barry W. Lynn said the ordinance is too broad. Read more

Federal Appellate Court To Hear Arguments In Case Challenging Louisiana School Prayer Law

Official Prayer Would Divide Students Along Religious Lines, Civil Liberties Groups Charge

An Alabama congressman is preparing to unveil federal legislation that would allow government posting of the Ten Commandments in public buildings and bar federal courts from hearing cases challenging the religious displays.

Rep. Robert B. Aderholt (R-Ala.) says he will reintroduce the legislation, which he has labeled the "Ten Commandments Defense Act," shortly after Labor Day.

Americans United for Separation of Church and State said Aderholt's legislation represents an assault on constitutional principles. Read more

White House Considers Renewed Drive To Fund Churches Through 'faith-based Initiative'

Bush Push To Win 'Charitable Choice' Grants For Religion Would Be Deeply Divisive, Charges AU's Lynn

The United States Supreme Court announced today that it will hear arguments in a case challenging the constitutionality of a religious school voucher program in Cleveland.

The justices have agreed to hear Zelman v. Simmons-Harris, which deals with a controversial program created six years ago that provides tax dollars to finance tuition at religious and other private schools. Read more

Supreme Court To Hear Arguments In Cleveland School Voucher Case

Announcement Sets Stage For Historic Church-State Showdown At High Court

A Louisiana law allowing daily spoken prayer by students and teachers in public schools violates the constitutional separation of church and state and would violate the rights of students.

That's the message that two civil liberties groups will deliver on Wednesday, Oct. 3, to the U.S. 5th Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans. Read more

'see You At The Pole' Events Are Legal If Schools Remain Neutral, Says Americans United

AU's Lynn Reminds Parents That Observances Are Often Evangelistic, Not Ecumenical

A renewed White House push to secure Senate passage of "charitable choice" funding for churches would be "deeply divisive," Americans United for Separation of Church and State has warned.

The Washington Post reported today that Bush administration officials are considering an aggressive drive on behalf of the "faith-based initiative," a package of proposals that would subsidize churches and other ministries that operate social services. Read more

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