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Walker v. Texas Division, Sons of Confederate Veterans

In Texas, nonprofit organizations may apply to the Texas Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) to have custom license plate designs made available to the public. The law, however, permits the DMV to “refuse to create a new specialty plate if the design might be offensive to any member of the public.”
 
In August 2009, the Texas Sons of Confederate Veterans submitted a custom license plate design to the DMV. The design featured the organization’s logo—a Confederate flag, framed by the organization’s name.

EEOC v. Abercrombie & Fitch

Abercrombie & Fitch clothing stores require employees to adhere to a “look policy,” calculated to showcase the store’s aesthetic sensibility. Among other things, the policy requires that employees abstain from wearing “caps” while working.
 
In 2008, a Muslim woman applied for a job at an Abercrombie & Fitch’s store in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Her faith requires her to wear a hijab—a traditional Muslim headscarf.

Tanco v. Haslam

In 2006, Tennessee amended its state constitution to limit the legal definition of marriage to that between a man and a woman, and also prohibited the recognition of marriage licenses issued to same-sex couples in other states. Proponents of the amendment grounded their support in biblical terms. Representative Bill Dunn, one of the amendment’s most prominent supporters, went so far as to write a newspaper article justifying the amendment using quotations from Scripture. 
 
Three same-sex couples sued to invalidate Tennessee’s marriage ban.

Obergefell v. Hodges

Ohio amended its state constitution in 2004 to restrict the legal definition of marriage to that between a man and a woman, and further prohibited the recognition of a legal relationship that “approximate[s] the design, qualities, significance or effect of marriage.” Support for the amendment came mostly from religious organizations, and their arguments were couched in explicitly religious terms.
 
Several same-sex couples and an adoption agency challenged Ohio’s marriage ban.

DeBoer v. Snyder

Michigan law does not allow same-sex couples to adopt children. A same-sex couple with adopted children initially challenged this law in January 2012, and later expanded their lawsuit to challenge the Michigan Marriage Amendment.

Bourke v. Beshear

In 1998, the Kentucky legislature passed a law limiting the legal definition of marriage to that between a man and a woman, and prohibited the recognition of marriage licenses issued to same-sex couples in other states. Eight years later, the state amended its constitution to codify these prohibitions.

Holt v. Hobbs

Gregory Holt goes by the name Abdul Maalik Muhammed and identifies as a devout Salafist Muslim. The prison where Holt is incarcerated bans all facial hair for inmates, ostensibly for security purposes. But prisoners suffering from skin conditions are given an exception and allowed to grow quarter-inch beards, and both the federal government and most other states allow inmates to wear beards for religious reasons. Holt’s request for an accommodation to grow a half-inch beard, in accordance with his faith, was denied by correctional officials. Read more

Conestoga Wood Specialties Corp. v. Burwell

As part of the Affordable Care Act's implementing regulations, group health plans are required to include coverage for various forms of preventative care, including all FDA-approved methods of contraception. Various secular, for-profit businesses with religious owners have filed lawsuits asserting that they cannot include contraception coverage in employee health plans without violating, among other things, their free exercise rights under the Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA). Read more

Burwell v. Hobby Lobby Stores, Inc.

As part of the Affordable Care Act's implementing regulations, group health plans are required to include coverage for various forms of preventative care, including all FDA-approved methods of contraception. Various secular, for-profit businesses with religious owners have filed lawsuits asserting that they cannot include contraception coverage in employee health plans without violating, among other things, their free exercise rights under the Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA).  Read more

Town of Greece v. Galloway

For years, the Greece Town Board has invited clergy to open the Board’s monthly meetings with a prayer. Over the past decade, all but two of the guest chaplains have been Christian, and the vast majority of prayers have been explicitly Christian. Guest chaplains often ask citizens to join in the prayers, and citizens face considerable pressure to participate. In February 2008, we filed a lawsuit on behalf of two local citizens, alleging that the Town’s practices violate the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment. Read more

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